DIGITAL
ASIC DESIGNER

MAX BJURLING

ASIC - Application Specific Integrated Circuit
An integrated circuit (IC) that has a specific function rather than a general task. This function is often more specialized than can be achieved in, for example, a gate matrix and less general than a microprocessor. An integrated circuit designed to control a cash register is an example of an ASIC design. A microchip, on the other hand, is not application-specific, as users can adapt it to many different uses.

FPGA Field-Programmable Gate Array

Can be translated by 'on-site programmable gate matrix', is an integrated circuit used in digital technology, whose physical function can be changed by transmitting new programming by connecting a simple cable. The function description of the circuit can be loaded directly via a data link (JTAG) to a computer or from memories such as RAM, ROM or flash memory. When the circuit is energized, any function can be loaded, or reloaded later with a new feature description as often as desired. Some FPGA circuits from companies such as Xilinx and Lattice Semiconductor are equipped with non-volatile computer memory from which the functional description is charged at voltage on, thus retaining the configuration even after loss of electrical voltage. An ASIC can be manufactured as an analogue, digital and mixed analog and digital (mixed signal) circuit. However, today a purely digital ASIC is by far the most common. 

Verilog, RTL logic, and chip verification are other areas of interest. As well as Cadence, Synplify, SoC and IC design.